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News Release 10-202

New Evidence Supports Snowball Earth as Trigger for Early Animal Evolution

Spike in ancient marine phosphorus concentrations linked to emergence of complex life

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Photo of Geologist Noah Plavansky examining rocks deposited after a Snowball Earth glacial event.

Geologist Noah Plavansky examines rocks deposited after a "Snowball Earth" glacial event.

Credit: Lyons Lab, UC-Riverside


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Photo: Drill core of sediments with iron formations used to track marine phosphorus concentrations.

Drill core of sediments with iron formations used to track marine phosphorus concentrations.

Credit: Lyons Lab, UC-Riverside


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Close-up of a sample of 2.7 billion-year-old iron formation from Zimbabwe; red is hematite.

Close-up of a sample of 2.7 billion-year-old iron formation from Zimbabwe; red is hematite.

Credit: Lyons Lab, UC-Riverside


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Photo: Scientists Noah Plavansky and Tim Lyons discuss attributes of a banded iron formation sample.

Scientists Noah Plavansky and Tim Lyons discuss attributes of a banded iron formation sample.

Credit: Lyons Lab, UC-Riverside


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