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News Release 12-129

Elegant Delivery

Sophisticated technique for delivering multiple cancer treatments may solve frustrating hurdle for combined drug therapies

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Illustration depicting the nanolipogel administering its immunotherapy cargo.

This illustration depicts the nanolipogel, developed at Yale University with NSF support, administering its immunotherapy cargo. The light-blue spheres within the blood vessels and the cutaway sphere in the foreground, are the nanolipogels (NLGs). As the NLGs break down, they release IL-2 (the green specks), which helps recruit and activate a body's immune response (the purple, sphere-like cells). The tiny, bright blue spheres are the additional treatment, a cancer drug that inhibits TGF-beta (one of the cancer's defense chemicals).

Credit: Nicolle Rager Fuller, NSF


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Yale University engineering professor Tarek Fahmy joined NSF to explain a novel, nanoscale, drug-delivery system that bundles powerful anti-cancer medicines into a single, treatment. The new approach solves several problems that hinder current drug delivery systems and has now proven effective in animal models.

Credit: National Science Foundation