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LGBT Pride

JUNE

In June of 1969, patrons and supporters of the Stonewall Inn in New York City staged an uprising to resist the police harassment and persecution to which LGBT Americans were commonly subjected. This uprising marks the beginning of a movement to outlaw discriminatory laws and practices against LGBT Americans. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month commemorates the events of June 1969 and works to achieve equal justice and equal opportunity for LGBT Americans. In 1998, President Clinton issued Executive Order 13087 expanding equal opportunity employment in the Federal government by prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation. On June 2, 2000, President Clinton issued Proclamation No. 7316 for Gay and Lesbian Pride Month. On June 1, 2009, President Obama issued Proclamation No. 8387 for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month. In this proclamation the President pointed to the contributions made by LGBT Americans both in promoting equal rights to all regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity and in broader initiatives such as the response to the global HIV pandemic. The President ended the proclamation by calling upon the people of the United States to "turn back discrimination and prejudice everywhere it exists."

2015 NSF LGBT Pride Month Observance

NSF's 2015 LGBT Pride Month keynote speaker was Dr. Lynn Conway, who gave a talk entitled "An Unexpected Woman: The Inside Story Behind the VLSI Revolution." Professor Conway, a transgender pioneer, made foundational contributions to computer architecture at IBM during the 1960s where, in 1968, she was fired when it was learned she was transitioning. A gritty survivor, she restarted her career in stealth mode. Rising rapidly through the ranks, she joined the famed Xerox Palo Alto Research Center in 1973. There she revolutionized Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) design, co-authored the seminal text Introduction to VLSI Systems and pioneered in teaching the new chip design methods at MIT, thereby launching a worldwide revolution in microelectronics.

A text transcript of Dr. Conway's talk can be accessed here, as well a copy of her PowerPoint slides, which contain hyperlinks to additional information, source material and references.