Table 3-13
Scientists and engineers who are working involuntarily out of field, by S&E degree field: 1993–2010
(Percent)
 
S&E degree field 1993 1995 1997 1999 2003 2006 2008 2010
 
All scientists and engineers 7.8 7.7 7.3 5.4 5.9 6.2 5.3 6.4
Highest degree in S&E field 9.2 8.9 8.5 6.3 7.8 8.1 7.1 8.4
Biological, agricultural, and environmental life sciences 10.3 10.2 10.0 8.3 10.1 9.7 10.1 10.1
Computer and mathematical sciences 5.3 4.1 4.0 2.9 4.9 5.7 4.5 5.1
Physical sciences 9.7 10.2 10.0 7.6 8.8 8.6 7.1 8.2
Social sciences 13.3 12.7 12.1 8.7 10.1 10.6 9.2 11.3
Engineering 4.4 4.4 3.9 2.7 4.2 4.5 3.6 4.9
 

NOTES: During 1993–99, scientists and engineers include those with one or more S&E degrees at the bachelor’s level or higher or those who have only a non-S&E degree at the bachelor’s level or higher and are employed in an S&E occupation. During 2003–10, scientists and engineers include those with one or more S&E or S&E-related degrees at the bachelor’s level or higher or those who have only a non-S&E degree at the bachelor’s level or higher and are employed in an S&E or S&E-related occupation. The involuntarily out-of-field rate is the proportion of all employed individuals who report that their job is not related to their field of highest degree because a job in their highest degree field was not available.

SOURCE: National Science Foundation, National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics, Scientists and Engineers Statistical Data System (SESTAT) (1993–2010), http://sestat.nsf.gov.

Science and Engineering Indicators 2014