text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
Discoveries
design element
Discoveries
Search Discoveries
About Discoveries
Discoveries by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images

Discovery
Deeper View Helps Explain Rio Grande Rift

Back to article | Note about images

Illustration comparing two theories behind the Rio Grande rifting.

This illustration shows the result of data collected by La RISTRA researchers and reveals the properties of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Rio Grande. From the information, the researchers suspect the pure shear model is the more probable explanation, with a "taffy-like" thinning of the lower crust and the upper crust faulting in many places to produce the rift valley. This scenario is in contrast to the "simple shear" model wherein a single, large detachment fault controls continental rifting.

Credit: Nicolle Rager, NSF


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (504 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Diagonal line showing location of RISTRA seismic instruments.

The diagonal line shows the location of seismic instruments used to image the geological structures beneath the Rio Grande Rift. The darkened region through central New Mexico denotes the Rio Grande Rift.

Credit: New Mexico State University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (839 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Joe Leon, a former graduate student at New Mexico Tech, is shown servicing a RISTRA seismic station.

Joe Leon, a former graduate student at New Mexico Tech, is shown servicing a RISTRA seismic station near Monument Valley in Utah.

Credit: New Mexico State University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (608 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page