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Discovery

Beauty Is in the Genes of the Beholder

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American pronghorn male defending his harem.

An American pronghorn male defending his harem has spotted a rival and is running to chase him away.

Credit: John Byers, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho


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A solitary American pronghorn male on the National Bison Range in western Montana.

A solitary American pronghorn male on the National Bison Range in western Montana in September.

Credit: John Byers, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho


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A group of pregnant American pronghorn females on the National Bison Range.

A group of pregnant American pronghorn females on the National Bison Range in May. Note the ear tags that uniquely identify each individual.

Credit: John Byers, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho


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An American pronghorn male defending a harem of two females.

An American pronghorn male defends a small harem of two females in September.

Credit: John Byers, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho


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American pronghorn males begin to tolerate each other.

In October, near the end of the period of sexual excitement and reproductive activity, American pronghorn males abruptly begin to tolerate each other.

Credit: John Byers, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho


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American pronghorn females feed voraciously to regain energy.

At the end of the estrus in October, females feed voraciously to regain energy that they've lost in the mate sampling period.

Credit: John Byers, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho


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