text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
Discoveries
design element
Discoveries
Search Discoveries
About Discoveries
Discoveries by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images

Discovery
Into Thin Air

Back to article | Note about images

Biologist Jessica Meir isn't just researching bar-headed geese--she's parenting them too. She's raised a brood of twelve goslings since birth, in a process known as imprinting. But the imprinting is just a tool. The real question behind Meir's research is something else: How do these geese accomplish super-bird feats of flight?

Credit: Steve McNally and Lisa Raffensperger, National Science Foundation. Images credited at video's end.

 

Researcher Jessica Meir is followed by goslings that have imprinted on her.

Researcher Jessica Meir obtained the geese at Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park in North Carolina. She stayed with them there for three weeks to begin the imprinting process and to wait until they were big enough to travel.

Credit: Jessica Meir, Scripps Institute of Oceanography at UCSD


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (525 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Flight training for an imprinted bar-headed goose.

Flight training for an imprinted bar-headed goose.

Credit: Joel Rabel


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (137 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Meir is surrounded by all 12 of her imprinted gosslings.

Meir is surrounded by all 12 of her imprinted gosslings.

Credit: Jessica Meir, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UCSD.


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (352 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Bar-headed geese are named for two stripes appearing across the head of adult birds.

Bar-headed geese are named for two horizontal stripes that appear across the head of adult birds.

Credit: Katie Kuker


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (283 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Comparison of flying altitude of bar-headed geese to aircraft and other birds.

Comparison of flying altitude of bar-headed geese to aircraft and other birds.

Credit: Nicolle Rager Fuller


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (154 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page