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All Images

Discovery
The Search Serpent: The Next Wave in Robotics

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Photo of the snake robot that moves without the aid of a fixed base.

Howie Choset has developed a snake robot that moves without the aid of a fixed base. It can coordinate internal degrees movement to do a variety of locomotion capabilities.

Credit: Howie Choset, Carnegie Mellon University


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Howie Choset, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University, received an NSF award for "Optimal Gaits and Designs in Locomoting Systems." He is interested in designing a snake robot that not only understands how to chart its path through any type of terrain, but has many degrees of freedom for motion for a variety of applications.

Credit: Gwendolyn Morgan, National Science Foundation

 

Image of a snake robot that seeks out and removes damaged tissue in a heart.

Choset has developed another type of snake robot for minimally invasive heart surgery, known as a CardioArm. Its main purpose is to seek out and remove the damaged tissue.

Credit: Howie Choset, Carnegie Mellon University


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Photo of a snake robot showing the light.

Choset added sensors, a camera and a light so that the robotic snake can function for a number of different conditions. One of its main functions will be to serve as a tool for search and rescue.

Credit: Howie Choset, Carnegie Mellon University


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