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Border crossing: 10 things to know about invasive fire ants on the march

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fire ants on a plant

Invasive fire ants: They're on the march across the U.S. Southeast and beyond.

Credit: Wikimedia Commons


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Invasive fire ants. Crossing the border from South America to North America, they're on the march across the U.S. Southeast and beyond. How does habitat--in particular, corridors that connect one place with another--help these ants spread?

Credit: Video: NSF; Photo: USDA


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closeup of a fire ant's head

Mowing your lawn? Planning a hike or picnic? Watch where you walk or spread your blanket.

Credit: USDA


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Scientists Julian Resasco (left) and Elizabeth Long at a fire ant site in a forest

Scientists Julian Resasco (left) and Elizabeth Long collect data at the fire ant study site.

Credit: Nick Haddad


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A newly emerged fire ant queen

A newly emerged fire ant queen, ready to disperse and establish a new colony.

Credit: Nash Turley


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Large fire ant colonie mound

Larger fire ant colonies build larger mounds, which are filled with aggressive ants.

Credit: Julian Resasco


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scientists in a corridor connecting two fire ant sites in a forested area

The habitat at the study site. A corridor that connects to another is in the background.

Credit: Julian Resasco


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