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Frontiers
SRS Studies Show . . .

March/April 1998

DEGREE TYPE AFFECTS EMPLOYMENT PROSPECTS:

While new science and engineering (S&E) graduates have a harder time finding jobs than they did in the late 1980s, a master's degree almost triples their chances and has a significant impact on starting salaries. Engineering graduates have the best chance for degree-related jobs and tend to earn higher salaries than science graduates. Women engineers average slightly higher incomes than their male colleagues.
[September 1995]

IMMIGRATION OF S&Es UP IN 1993:

Even as overall immigration to the United States decreased, immigration of scientists and engineers increased, with 23,534 admitted to the United States on permanent visas. Just under 62% were engineers; nearly half were mathematical scientists and computer specialists. Women, mostly from Asian countries, accounted for 21.3%, up from 15.8% in 1989.
[November 1995]

SHIFTS IN S&E GRADUATE ENROLLMENT:

Women's enrollment in graduate S&E programs grew 1.7% in 1994, even as overall enrollment declined by 1.0%. The enrollment of S&E minority students with U.S. citizenship increased slightly. Fields of study in science shifted, with small decreases in physical, computer and mathematical sciences, and aerospace, electrical, industrial, mechanical and materials engineering. Chemical and civil engineering had small increases.
[November 1996]

R&D LINKED TO INNOVATION:

A pilot study of 1,000 U.S. companies found that research and development (R&D) is performed by 84% of innovative companies, that is, those reporting a new or technologically changed product or process in 1990-1992. The survey was part of an international effort to understand industrial innovation. Leading industries characterized by innovation are computer hardware, precision instruments and equipment, pharmaceuticals, and chemicals.
[December 1996]

UNDERREPRESENTED GROUPS MAKE GAINS IN S&E:

Percentages of black, Hispanic and American Indian students taking basic and advanced mathematics courses increased dramatically in the last decade. The percentage of minorities taking chemistry and physics also doubled. The outlook for S&Es with disabilities was mixed: While they have a harder time entering the workforce, they fare well once employed. Participation of women is increasing, although skewed towards fields such as psychology and sociology, and away from areas like engineering and physics.
[July/August 1997]

For copies of Data Briefs and Issue Briefs on SRS studies, call SRS at (703) 292-8774, or send an e-mail to srsweb@nsf.gov.


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