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Press Release 05-014
NSF Submits Its Fiscal 2006 Budget Request of $5.6 Billion

Even in a tight budget climate, director sees opportunities to enable scientific growth

Back to article | Note about images

NSF FY 2006 Budget Request to Congress cover/Gravitational Waves from In-Spiraling Black Holes

NSF FY 2006 Budget Request to Congress
About the cover image: Gravitational Waves from In-Spiraling Black Holes. This simulation of orbiting black holes was created on the Itanium Linux Cluster supercomputer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. The ripples shown are known as gravitational waves, which result from the merging of two back holes. NCSA, which receives support from the National Science Foundation, has an international reputation in high performance computing and networking and in developing innovative software applications.

Credit: Ed Seidel, LSU; Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute); visualization by Werner Benger, Zuse Institute Berlin


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2 ships at McMurdo Station in January 2005

The U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Polar Star (left) and the Navy tanker USNS Paul Buck at the ice pier at McMurdo Station, NSF's logistics hub in Antarctica. In the background are the Russian icebreaker Krasin (center), which assisted the Polar Star this year in breaking a channel through McMurdo Sound, and the NSF research vessel Nathaniel B. Palmer.

Credit: Brien Barnett


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photo of bathroom damaged by the tsunami

The bathroom of a brick home in Sumatra partially survived the tsunami.

Credit: Jose C. Borrero, University of Southern California Tsunami Research Group


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graph comparing diagnostic tools according to sensitivity and applicability to various bodily fluids

The bio-bar-code amplification technology, which is a million times more sensitive than enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) tests, can detect ADDLs in cerebrospinal fluid where the biomarker is present in very low concentrations. The goal is to ultimately detect and validate the marker in blood.

Credit: Northwestern University


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from illustration comparing views of avian brain

A wide range of studies have recently demonstrated that the so-called "primitive" regions of avian brains are actually sophisticated processing regions homologous to those in mammals. The above illustrations compare the traditional view of the primitive avian brain as a subregion of the human brain (in purple) with the new view that the avian brain has subregions proportional to those in humans (blue, purple and green). Scientists now know that the complexities of avian brain regions allow sensory processing, motor control and sensorimotor learning as in the mammalian neocortex (in green).

Credit: Zina Deretsky, National Science Foundation


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