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Press Release 05-169
NSF Centers Will Use Nano-Interface Control and Bioengineering for Materials by Design

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Scientists observed trapped electrical charge in an organic semiconductor for the first time.

Cornell scientists are trying to better understand conductivity in organic electronic materials--carbon-based molecules that behave like semiconductors--so they might one day be used for cheap mass-produced electronics, sensors, and solar cells. Using electric-force microscopy, the scientists observed trapped electrical charge in an organic semiconductor for the first time.

Credit: John A. Marohn, Erik M. Muller, Cornell Center for Materials Research; copyright Advanced Materials, Wiley-VCH

 



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