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Press Release 06-014
Closer to Home

Discovery of small, rocky, extrasolar world suggests such planets may be common

Back to article | Note about images

ESO artist's rendition of the newly discovered extrasolar planet

European Southern Observatory artist's rendition of the newly discovered extrasolar planet

Credit: European Southern Observatory


Download the high-resolution TIF version of the image. (58.3 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Participants at the live webcast in the studio and on screen.

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On Jan. 25, 2006, NSF hosted a media briefing to present the findings from a new type of planet discovery. Webcast live, the briefing featured NSF Assistant Director for Mathematical and Physical Sciences Michael Turner, David Bennett, an astrophysicist with the PLANET research collaboration and the University of Notre Dame, Jean-Philippe Beaulieu of PLANET and the Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, France, and Scott Tremaine of Princeton University.

For more information about the webcast, see: http://www.nsf.gov/news/newsmedia/planet06/.

Credit: Patrick Olmert, National Science Foundation

 

NASA/ESA/STScI rendition of the newly discovered extrasolar planet

This artist's illustration shows an icy/rocky planet orbiting a dim star. Astronomers detected an extrasolar planet five times as massive as Earth circling a relatively cool red dwarf star. The distance between the planet, designated OGLE-2005-BLG-390Lb, and its host is about three times greater than that between the Earth and the Sun. The planet's large orbit and its dim parent star make its likely surface temperature a frigid minus 364 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 220 degrees Celsius).

Credit: NASA, ESA and G. Bacon (STScI)


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (983 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

This animation explains gravitational microlensing.

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This animation explains gravitational microlensing.

Credit: Trent Schindler, National Science Foundation

 

This animation explains how gravitational microlensing detects planets.

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This animation explains how gravitational microlensing detects planets.

Credit: Andrew Williams, University of Western Australia / David Bennett, University of Notre Dame

 

Artist's impression of the newly found exoplanet

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This video depicts a computer animation of the newly discovered planet and its star plus explanatory information from researchers at the European Southern Observatory.

Other versions of the video are available here.

Credit: ESO

 



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