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Fact Sheet
Engineers Week 2006: NSF Research Highlights

Today's engineers are inspiration for the future

Back to article | Note about images

Penelope SIS prepares for her surgical debut.

Penelope SIS prepares for her surgical debut. See Penelope aiding in surgery at: http://real21mt.audiovideoweb.com/ramgen/nj20real2550/nsf/penelope3.smi

Credit: Courtesy of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

 

The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Solar-Powered Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (SAUV)

The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Solar-Powered Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (SAUV). See a video of the submarine in action at: http://easylink.playstream.com/nsf/rpi_broll.smi

Credit: RPI; Zina Deretsky, NSF


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Engineers inspect a portion of a New Orleans floodwall damaged in Hurricane Katrina

American Society of Civil Engineers geotechnical-team members inspect a portion of the floodwall along the Industrial Canal that was overtopped and flattened by Katrina's storm surge. The force of the storm shattered much of the concrete wall that topped the steel sheet-piles.

Credit: Rune Storesund photos


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Hong Liu (left) and Bruce Logan examine an electrochemically assisted microbial reactor system

Hong Liu (left) and Bruce Logan examine an electrochemically assisted microbial reactor system. An animation showing a related technology is available at: http://websrvr80il.audiovideoweb.com/il80web20024/nsf/microbe.mov

Credit: Greg Grieco, Penn State University


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Ocean-buoy generators promise to convert the movement of waves into energy.

Ocean-buoy generators, like the one illustrated here, promise to convert the movement of waves into energy. Voltage is induced when waves cause coils located inside the buoy to move relative to the magnetic field of the anchored shaft. This process generates electricity.

Credit: Nicolle Rager Fuller, NSF


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Polymer fibers grow on a fingerprint at 30 degrees Celsius and a relatively high humidity

Polymer fibers grow on a fingerprint at 30 degrees Celsius and a relative humidity of more than 95 percent. Image (a) is a low-magnification view, and image (b) shows a close-up view of the same (the inset shows the top view of fiber).

Credit: Reproduced by permission of The Royal Society of Chemistry; PSU


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