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Media Advisory 06-010

Polar Neutrino Observatory Takes a Big Step Forward

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Robert Paulos holds one of the optical sensing modules.

Robert Paulos, Associate Director for Engineering and Project Support, holds one of the optical sensing modules that comprise the detector.

Credit: Peter West, National Science Foundation


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A firn drill is used to melt snow at the surface

A firn drill is used to melt snow at the surface in preparation for a novel hot-water drill that is used to make the deep holes for strings of light sensors.

Credit: Peter West, National Science Foundation


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A worker takes a sensor from the shelves at the South Pole drilling site.

A worker takes a sensor from the shelves at the South Pole drilling site.

Credit: Peter West, National Science Foundation


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Terry Bensen watches the drilling equipment come up from the hole.

Terry Bensen, with the IceCube project, watches the drilling equipment come up from the hole.

Credit: Peter West, National Science Foundnation


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Detectors are frozen in place nearly 1.5 miles deep in the ice.

Detectors are frozen in place nearly 1.5 miles deep in the ice.

Credit: Peter West, National Science Foundation


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