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Press Release 06-064
Nanogenerators May Spark Miniature Machines

Devices convert simple motion into electricity

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Georgia Tech Professor Zhong Lin Wang holds a sample nanowire array.

Georgia Tech Professor Zhong Lin Wang holds a sample nanowire array that can produce electrical current from mechanical energy.

Credit: Gary Meek


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Zhong Lin Wang leads a nanoscience and nanotechnology research group at Georgia Tech.

Zhong Lin Wang leads a nanoscience and nanotechnology research group in the School of Materials Science and Engineering of the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Credit: Gary Meek


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Zinc oxide nanowires produce current when bent.

A scanning electron microscope image (top) shows an array of zinc oxide nanowires. Middle image shows a schematic of how an AFM tip was used to bend nanowires to produce current. Bottom image depicts output voltages produced by the array as it is scanned by the AFM tip.

Credit: Z. L. Wang


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