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All Images


Press Release 07-105
Catching Some Rays

Enormous detector makes first real-time detection of elusive, low-energy neutrinos streaming from the sun's core

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The fully-assembled Borexino detector is visible from multiple cameras embedded in the structure.

The fully-assembled Borexino detector is visible from multiple cameras embedded in the structure. In this image, the view of the interior of the sphere is distorted by the camera lens.

Credit: INFN


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Photomultipliers line the steel chamber of the Borexino detector.

Photomultipliers line the steel chamber of the Borexino detector in this image taken during the detector's construction phase. While the chamber is spherical, the appearance is exaggerated by the distortion of the view through the camera lens.

Credit: Virginia Tech; INFN


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In this model, one can see the "onion shell" of the Borexino experiment.

In this model, one can see the "onion shell" of the Borexino experiment (Water Tank, SSS/Buffer, Inner vessel) and the "Big Building" with electronics and supporting facilities.

Credit: INFN


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The nylon vessels hang during testing at Princeton University in August 2001.

The nylon vessels hang during testing at Princeton University in August 2001.

Credit: INFN; Princeton University


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Photo of Princeton Physics Department in a clean room.

John Bahcall was one of the elder statesmen of solar neutrino physics. He visited the Princeton Physics Department clean room in October 2001, during the year-long process of construction of the Borexino nylon vessels. Left to right: Andrea Pocar, John Bahcall, Charles Sule, Allan Nelson, Elizabeth Harding (in background), Brian Kennedy.

Credit: Princeton University


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A photomultiplier tube from the Borexino experiment.

A photomultiplier tube from the Borexino experiment.

Credit: INFN


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Photo of a technican installing the optical fibers of the experiment's calibration system

A technican installs the optical fibers of the experiment's calibration system surrounded by photomultipliers embedded in the steel sphere.

Credit: INFN


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