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Press Release 08-037
High-School Scientists Decode DNA Sequence, Present Findings

New Jersey students publish their findings, present their work at the National Science Foundation

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of high school student in lab

A high school student at work in the lab at part of an Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) project at Rutgers University. About 300 New Jersey high school students have an opportunity to do original research decoding a DNA sequence, working with bacteria containing a fragment of a DNA copy of RNA from brine shrimp.

Credit: Martin Nemeroff, Rutgers University


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Photo of student in lab with agar media plate

A student participating in the Rutgers ITEST project chooses bacteria colonies for her DNA sequencing project. The bacteria colonies contained a fragment of a DNA copy of RNA from brine shrimp.

Credit: Martin Nemeroff, Rutgers University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (1.6 MB)

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Photo of student scraping colonies off an agar media plate

A student scrapes colonies off an agar media plate for inoculation of liquid culture. At the Waksman Institute, both students and teachers gain knowledge of molecular biology and bioinformatics.

Credit: Martin Nemeroff, Rutgers University


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Photo of students doing bioinformatics research on computers

High school students do bioinformatics research on the lab computers at Rutgers. They were able to compare their sequence to other DNA sequences and predict the functions of the genes. They then went on to publish their findings throiugh the National center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at the National Institutes of Health.

Credit: Martin Nemeroff, Rutgers University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (1.9 MB)

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