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Press Release 08-160
NSF, NIH Award Ecology of Infectious Disease Grants

Scientists to study links between environmental changes, spread of infectious diseases

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Roosting bats in a village in Bangladesh are connected to an outbreak of Nipah virus there.

Roosting bats in a village in Bangladesh are connected to an outbreak of Nipah virus there.

Credit: Jon Epstein, EcoHealth Alliance


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Date-palm gatchers in Bangladesh, who tap trees for sap, may link Nipah virus, bats and humans.

Date-palm gatchers in Bangladesh, who make a living tapping date palm trees and selling the sap as a sweet drink, may be a link between Nipah virus-carrying bats and humans.

Credit: Jon Epstein, EcoHealth Alliance


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This army of ticks looking for hosts may carry anaplasmosis, an infectious disease in humans.

This army of ticks looking for hosts may be carrying anaplasmosis, an infectious disease in humans.

Credit: Felicia Keesing, Bard College


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EID scientists are studying West Nile virus transmission in songbirds.

EID scientists are studying West Nile virus transmission in songbirds.

Credit: Tony Goldberg, University of Wisconsin-Madison


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