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Press Release 08-186
Inmates Conduct Ecological Research on Slow-growing Mosses

Moss-in-Prisons project helps promote sustainable living

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of a prisoner behind bars.

The Moss-in-Prisons project promotes the rehabilitation of prisoners.

Credit: Nalini Nadkarni of Evergreen State College.


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Photo of moss stripped from a tree.

Ecologically important mosses are (often illegally) stripped from the old-growth forests of the Pacific Northwest for the growing horticulture trade, which currently exceeds $265 million per year. But because mosses may take decades to re-grow, such harvesting is not sustainable.

Credit: Nalini Nadkarni


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Photo of Nalini Nadkarni of Evergreen State College at Cedar Creek.

Nalini Nadkarni of Evergreen State College at Cedar Creek.

Credit: Nalini Nadkarni


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Photo of a Cedar Creek inmate and researcher in the Moss-in-Prisons project holding moss.

A Cedar Creek inmate and researcher in the Moss-in-Prisons project holds moss.

Credit: Nalini Nadkarni of Evergreen State College


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (287 KB)

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Photo of a Cedar Creek inmate and researcher in the Moss-in-Prisons project tending the garden.

A Cedar Creek inmate and researcher in the Moss-in-Prisons project tends the garden.

Credit: Nalini Nadkarni


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Photo of a Cedar Creek inmate and researcher in the Moss-in-Prisons project studying mosses.

A Cedar Creek inmate and researcher in the Moss-in-Prisons project studies mosses.

Credit: Nalini Nadkarni


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