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Press Release 08-206

Unlocking Climate Mysteries and Engaging Students from Harlem to Antarctica

New York City science teacher joins a team of scientists in Antarctica to investigate massive climate shifts; schools can chart their progress

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Photo of Shakira Brown, right, and Howard Koss on a C-17 en route to Antarctica.

Shakira Brown, right, a science teacher at New York's Harlem Children's Zone Promise Academy, and Howard Koss, a graduate student at Queens College, CUNY, on a C-17 flight from New Zealand to McMurdo Station in Antarctica as part of the Offshore New Harbor Project team. The project is conducting research into climate conditions over millions of years and participating in several outreach efforts that enable schools across the country to chart their progress.

Credit: Courtesy of Stephen Pekar, Queens College, CUNY.


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Photo of Stephen Pekar of Queens College, CUNY, and Marvin Speece of Montana Tech.

Stephen Pekar of Queens College, CUNY, and Marvin Speece of Montana Tech pose for a photo near the site of the Offshore New Harbor (ONH) Project team's area of study on the ice of the Ross Sea off the coast of Antarctica. Their research will offer new insights into the relationship between climate and ocean currents over millions of years.

Credit: Courtesy of Stephen Pekar of Queens College, CUNY.


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Photo of a green marker flag in the area where researchers are working.

A marker flag in the area where the Offshore New Harbor (ONH) Project researchers are working. Ferrar Valley is visible in the background.

Credit: Stephen Pekar, Queens College CUNY


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