text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
News
design element
News
News From the Field
For the News Media
Special Reports
Research Overviews
NSF-Wide Investments
Speeches & Lectures
NSF Current Newsletter
Multimedia Gallery
News Archive
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images


Press Release 09-081
Fire Is an Important and Under-Appreciated Part of Global Climate Change

Study identifies significant contributions of fire to climate change and identifies feedbacks between fire and climate change

Back to article | Note about images

Satellite image of smoke from Southern California wildfires billowing over the Pacific Ocean.

Smoke from Southern California wildfires billows over the Pacific Ocean.

Credit: Courtesy of MODIS Rapid Response Project at NASA/gsfc.


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (471 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Audio only

Play Audio
Teleconference on fire and Earth systems with Dr. David Bowman, University of Tasmania, Dr. Thomas Swetnam, University of Arizona, Dr. Jennifer Balch, National Center for Ecological Analysis + Synthesis, and Dr. Henry Gholz, National Science Foundation.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

Cover of April 24, 2009 issue of Science

The researchers' findings appear in the April 24, 2009, issue of Science.

Credit: Copyright AAAS 2009


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (1.5 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of a pine forest in Siberia burning.

A pine forest in Siberia burns. This fire was ignited as an experiment in 1994 to measure the emissions and ecological effects of high severity burns. Increased warming during recent decades has been accompanied by increasing numbers of enormous wildfires, which have burned millions of hectares in Siberian and Canadian forests.

Credit: Tom Swetnam, Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (3.6 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of a wildfire that burned 28,000 acres of Arizona forest and killed six firefighters.

This wildfire burned 28,000 acres of ponderosa pine forest in central Arizona and killed six firefighters. Increasing numbers of large wildfires and their costs, both human and natural, underscores the need to better understand their causes and consequences.

Credit: Tom Swetname, Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (285 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of researchers David Bowman and Jennifer Blach.

David Bowman of the University of Tasmania and Jennifer Balch of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis of the University of California at Santa Barbara. Bowman and Jennifer led a large research time that synthesized many studies to produce "Fire in Earth Systems."

Credit: Randall Lamb, University of California at Santa Barbara, courtesy of Kavli Institute for Theoretical Phyiscs.


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (421 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page