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Press Release 09-113
Corals' "Internal Communication" Process Critical to Maintaining Healthy Reefs

Disruptions causing decline of coral reefs around the world

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of fish swimming around a coral reef.

"Communication" is all-important, scientists are finding, on coral reefs.

Credit: NASA


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Photo of living corals, which consist of individual animal polyps atop a calcium carbonate skeleton.

Living corals are made up of individual animal polyps atop a calcium carbonate skeleton.

Credit: Eric Tambutte, Centre Scientifique de Monaco


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Scanning electron micrograph showing the calcium carbonate matrix of coral.

This close-up shows a coral after removal of the animal, leaving a matrix of calcium carbonate.

Credit: Eric Tambutte, Centre Scientifique de Monaco


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Cover of May 29, 2009, Science magazine.

The researchers' findings were published in the May 29, 2009, issue of Science magazine.

Credit: Copyright 2009 AAAS


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