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Press Release 09-118

The Abyss: Deepest Part of the Oceans No Longer Hidden

Nereus is first undersea vehicle to enable routine scientific investigation of ocean depths worldwide

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Photo of the hybrid remotely operated vehicle Nereus.

The hybrid remotely operated vehicle Nereus may be tethered or untethered to a mother ship.

Credit: WHOI


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Photo of the HROV Nereus in the deepest part of the world's oceans.

The HROV Nereus has successfully reached the abyss: the deepest part of the world's oceans.

Credit: WHOI


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Photo of the hybrid remotely operated vehicle Nereus collecting sediment from the Mariana Trench.

The hybrid remotely operated vehicle Nereus collects sediment from the Mariana Trench.

Credit: WHOI


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Map showing the location of the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the world's oceans.

The Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the world's oceans, is near Guam.

Credit: NOAA


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Illustration shows the Mariana Trench at the boundary between two tectonic plates.

The Mariana Trench is the boundary between two tectonic plates: the Pacific and the Mariana.

Credit: NOAA


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