text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
News
design element
News
News From the Field
For the News Media
Special Reports
Research Overviews
NSF-Wide Investments
Speeches & Lectures
NSF Current Newsletter
Multimedia Gallery
News Archive
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images


Press Release 09-138
Classifying "Clicks"

New language technology clears up 100-year-old mystery

Back to article | Note about images

Two people in chairs and the words Audio Slideshow

Follow linguists in this audio slideshow as they unravel the mechanics of exotic African click languages before these languages go extinct.

Credit: Lisa Raffensperger, National Science Foundation

 

New high-speed, ultrasound imaging could change how linguists describe "click languages."

New high-speed, ultrasound imaging of the human tongue potentially could change how linguists describe 'click languages' and help speech scientists understand the physics of speech production. Here, Ouma Hannie Koerant, a speaker of N|uu, a severely endangered click language spoken by fewer than 10 people in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa, prepares to have her mouth and tongue imaged as she pronounces N|uu words. The ultrasound stabilization headset anchors an ultrasound probe in the same spot under her chin throughout the recording session.

Credit: Johanna Brugman, Cornell University, and Bonny Sands, Northern Arizona University.


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (2.5 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Portable, high-speed, ultrasound equipment allows linguists to see tongue movement during clicks.

High-speed, ultrasound imaging of the human tongue helped linguists precisely categorize sounds produced by the N|uu language speakers of southern Africa's Kalahari Desert. The equipment allowed speech scientists to see the entire movement of the tongue during the production of clicks in ways that previous imaging tools could not.

Credit: Credit: Johanna Brugman, Cornell University and Bonny Sands, Northern Arizona University.


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (3.4 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page