text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
News
design element
News
News From the Field
For the News Media
Special Reports
Research Overviews
NSF-Wide Investments
Speeches & Lectures
NSF Current Newsletter
Multimedia Gallery
News Archive
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images


Press Release 09-141
What Scientists Know About Jewel Beetle Shimmer

Iridescent green beetles could provide blueprint for light-reflecting materials

Back to article | Note about images

The structure of jewel beetle cells results in striking colors as light hits them from angles.

Research suggests jewel beetle cells come from spontaneous arrangement of glucose-like particles called chitin molecules that form as cones. When these cones solidify, they preserve their structures and produce different colors as light hits them from different angles.

Credit: Zina Deretsky, National Science Foundation


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (740 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of green jewel beetle and the words Audio Slideshow.

Look inside a beetle's shell in this audio slideshow, to see the secrets of its shimmer. To start the slideshow, click on the screen or on the play arrow in the lower left. Alternatively, you can navigate with the arrow keys or view the whole set of pictures at once using the buttons in the lower right.

Credit: Lisa Raffensperger, National Science Foundation

 

Photograph of a jewel beetle.

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta recently discovered jewel beetles, Chrysina gloriosa, change color because of the light-reflecting properties of the cells that make up their external skeletons, not because of unique, light-absorbing properties in their pigment.

Credit: Georgia Tech, Gary W. Meek


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (1 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Cover of the July 24, 2009, issue of Science magazine.

The researchers' findings appear in the July 24, 2009, issue of Science magazine.

Credit: Copyright 2009 AAAS


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (1.1 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page