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Media Advisory 09-031

Evolution of Evolution: A National Science Foundation Webcast

Honoring 150 years of "On the Origin of Species;" Noor is recipient of Darwin-Wallace Medal

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Illustration of Charles Darwin.

On Nov. 24, 1859, Charles Darwin published "On the Origin of Species." It became the most significant scientific work in the last two centuries, challenging and changing how the world views nature, the environment and mankind.

Credit: Illustrations by Nicolle Rager Fuller, National Science Foundation (background and center); 2009 JupiterImages Corporation (top right); NASA, ESA, M. Robberto (Space Telescope Science Institute/ESA) and the Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team (bottom).


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Jim Secord, the director of the Darwin Coorespondence Project, discusses popular mythology surrounding natural selection.

Credit: Kevin Norris/National Science Foundation and University of Cambridge

 

Mohamed Noor discusses Charles Darwin's idea of gemmules and the creation of new species.

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Mohamed Noor, professor and associate chair of biology at Duke University, discusses Charles Darwin's idea of gemmules and the creation of new species. Noor is a recipient of the 2009 Darwin-Wallace Medal Award.

Credit: Audio by Kevin Norris/National Science Foundation; image 2009 JupiterImages Corporation and James J. Caras/National Science Foundation

 

Professor of geological sciences at the University of Idaho, Judy Totman Parrish, discusses how geographic evolution will change Earth's continents.

Credit: Kevin Norris/National Science Foundation and University of Idaho

 

Anthony Remijan discusses how the first constituents for life could be found in outer space.

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Anthony Remijan, an assistant scientist with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, discusses how the first constituents for life could be found in outer space.

Credit: Audio by Kevin Norris/National Science Foundation; image by Dave Finley, NRAO/AUI/NSF