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All Images


Press Release 10-014
Scientists Return to Haiti to Assess Possibility of Another Major Quake

Geoscientists will collect crucial data for future hazard assessment

Back to article | Note about images

A GPS receiver and antenna sit atop a roof in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

In a pre-earthquake photo, a GPS receiver and antenna sit atop a roof in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

Credit: Purdue University/Eric Calais


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Geophysicist Eric Calais holds a geodetic marker that tracks even very small Earth movements.

Geophysicist Eric Calais holds a geodetic marker that tracks even very small Earth movements.

Credit: Purdue News Service file photo/David Umberger


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Louis Obenson of Haiti's Civil Protection Agency installs GPS equipment in Port-au-Prince.

Louis Obenson of Haiti's Civil Protection Agency installs GPS equipment in Port-au-Prince.

Credit: Purdue University/Eric Calais


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In Haiti, areas in red are closer to rupture; grey circles show the locations of aftershocks.

In Haiti, areas in red are closer to rupture; grey circles show the locations of aftershocks.

Credit: Purdue University/Eric Calais


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The seismotectonic context of Earth's Caribbean tectonic plate is shown in this map.

The seismotectonic context of Earth's Caribbean tectonic plate is shown in this map.

Credit: Purdue University/Eric Calais


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This map shows the historical seismicity in Hispaniola before 1960.

This map shows the historical seismicity on the island of Hispaniola before 1960. Haiti and the Dominican Republic are the two countries located on Hispaniola.

Credit: Purdue University/Eric Calais


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