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Press Release 10-026
For Nanowires, Nothing Sparkles Quite Like Diamond

Diamond nanowires emit single photons, providing new options for high-speed computing, advanced imaging and secure communication

Back to article | Note about images

Illustration of a diamond nanowire matrix emitting a stream of single photons.

A Harvard-based team has manufactured a matrix of diamond nanowires with defects called nitrogen vacancies. When stimulated with green light, these defects emit one red photon at a time. Such a construct is promising for the new field of quantum computing.

Credit: Zina Deretsky, National Science Foundation


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