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Press Release 10-028
2009 Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge Winners Announced

Winning entries appear in the Feb. 19 issue of Science

Back to article | Note about images

Art installation illustrating endothelial cells.

"Branching Morphogenesis" aims to reveal--through abstraction--the unseen beauty and dynamic relationships that exist between endothelial cells and their surrounding extracellular microenvironment. Movies of networking endothelial cells cultured on a 3-D matrix were analyzed to generate computational tools that simulate this process. Next, large-scale templates from simulations were overlaid with more than 75,000 inter-connected zipties.

Credit: Peter Lloyd Jones, Andrew Lucia, and Jenny E. Sabin, University of Pennsylvania's Sabin + Jones Lab Studio


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Discover the artistry behind the 2009 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge winners as they explain the processes, techniques and thoughts behind their entries.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

Scanning electron micrograph of tiny plastic fingers around a sphere.

Tiny plastic fingers, each with a diameter 1/500th of a human hair, assemble around and hold a tiny sphere. The image brings to mind global efforts to promote the sustainability of the planet. The image was produced with a scanning electronic microscope and was digitally enhanced for color.

Credit: Sung Hoon Kang, Joanna Aizenberg, and Boaz Pokroy, Harvard University


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Illustration showing a solution of Sine-Gordon Equation, the Kuen's surface.

This illustration is titled, Kuen's Surface: A Meditation on Euclid, Lobachevsky, and Quantum Fields. This formula is a particular solution of the Sine-Gordon Equation, and like all solutions of that equation, it describes an example of a very special kind of surface--Kuen's surface. Kuen's Surface serves as a symbol of the 2,000 years of futile attempts to prove the Parallel Postulate from the other axioms.

Credit: Richard Palais and Luc Benard, University of California at Irvine


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As children, identical twins are indistinguishable. But as they reach adulthood, physical differences develop: One twin may go gray earlier or the other's facial features may seem more youthful. The video "The Epigenetics of Identical Twins" uses a low tech approach to explain that one reason for this phenomenon is epigenetics, the chemical changes cells make to chromosomes.

Credit: Genetic Science Learning Center, University of Utah
Harmony Starr, Molly Malone and Brendan Nicholson

 

Cover of the Feb. 19 issue of the journal Science featuring Visualization Challenge winners.

The work of the Visualization Challenge winners is featured in the Feb. 19 issue of the journal Science.

Credit: AAAS 2010


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