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Press Release 10-126
Latest "Green" Packing Material? Mushrooms!

Packing foam now entering the marketplace is engineered from mushrooms and agricultural waste

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EcoCradle packaging material is composed of agricultural byproducts bound by fungal roots.

EcoCradle™ packaging material is composed of agricultural byproducts (cotton gin trash) bound together by fungal mycelium. With an appearance and functionality of polymer foams, EcoCradle™ can be manufactured with just one eighth the energy and one tenth the carbon dioxide of traditional foam packing material.

Credit: Edward Browka, Ecovative Design


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A packing material called Mycobond™, a composite of inedible agricultural waste and mushroom roots, grows itself. As a result, its manufacture requires just one eighth the energy and one tenth the carbon dioxide of traditional foam packing material. This time-lapse sequence shows a Mycobond™ packing component growing within a pre-designed mold.

Credit: Ecovative Design

 



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