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All Images


Press Release 10-151
Genetic Structure of First Animal to Show Evolutionary Response to Climate Change Determined

Pitcher plant-dwelling mosquito shows effects of Earth's rapidly changing climate

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of a water-filled purple pitcher plant leaf.

The pitcher plant mosquito develops entirely within the water-filled purple pitcher plant.

Credit: William Bradshaw and Christina Holzapfel


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (113 KB)

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Photo of an adult female mosquito descending into a purple pitcher plant leaf.

An adult female mosquito descends into a purple pitcher plant leaf in southern Wisconsin.

Credit: Christina Holzapfel and William Bradshaw


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (151 KB)

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Photo of Wyeomyia smithii.

Populations of Wyeomyia smithii migrated north along the Atlantic Coast about 20,000 years ago.

Credit: Christina Holzapfel and William Bradshaw


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (380 KB)

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Photo of the purple pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea.

The purple pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea, ranges from the Gulf of Mexico to Canada.

Credit: Christina Holzapfel and William Bradshaw


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Photo of S. purpurea and S. flava in northern Florida.

In northern Florida, S. purpurea overlaps with S. flava with which it can form hybrids.

Credit: Christina Holzapfel and William Bradshaw


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Photo of red-leaved hybrid of S. purpurea and S. flava.

This hybrid S. purpurea and S. flava plant has red leaves and is more than 35 years old.

Credit: Christina Holzapfel and William Bradshaw


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (324 KB)

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Photo of a pitcher plant with pink flowers, which is characteristic of Gulf Coast populations.

The pitcher plant in this image has the pink flowers characteristic of Gulf Coast populations.

Credit: Christina Holzapfel and William Bradshaw


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (476 KB)

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Photo of crimson flowers which is indicative of northern populations of purple pitcher plants.

Crimson flowers are indicative of northern populations of the purple pitcher plant.

Credit: Christina Holzapfel and William Bradshaw


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (282 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



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