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Press Release 11-025
The Most Genes in an Animal? Tiny Crustacean Holds the Record

New "model organism" to help environmental health protection

Back to article | Note about images

Image of a Daphnia or water flea.

The tiny water flea Daphnia has the most genes of any animal, some 31,000.

Credit: Paul Hebert, University of Guelph


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Photo of a Daphnia, or water flea, with a clonal brood of offspring.

Daphnia, or water flea, with a clonal brood of offspring.

Credit: Paul Hebert, University of Guelph


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Image of the defensive helmet that helps protect Daphnia against predators.

A defensive helmet helps protect Daphnia against predators.

Credit: Paul Hebert, University of Guelph


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Image of a Daphnia with mild defensive neckteeth.

Daphnia with mild defensive neckteeth; the teeth are used against predators.

Credit: Paul Hebert, University of Guelph


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Image of two juvenile Daphnia with and without defensive neckteeth.

Juvenile Daphnia with and without defensive neckteeth.

Credit: Christian Laforsch, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat, Munich


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Cover of the February 4, 2011 issue of the journal Science.

The researchers' findings are described in the February 4, 2011 issue of the journal Science.

Credit: Copyright AAAS 2011


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