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Press Release 11-120

Where Have All the Flowers Gone?

High-mountain wildflower season reduced, affecting pollinators like bees, hummingbirds

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Photo of dwarf bluebells with a snow-capped mountain in the background.

Dwarf bluebells is one of the earliest plants to bloom in spring; queen bees come to it for nectar.

Credit: David Inouye


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Photo of a bumblebee worker visiting flowers of the tall bluebell.

A bumblebee worker visits flowers of the tall bluebell for both nectar and pollen.

Credit: David Inouye


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Photo of a female broadtailed hummingbird collecting nectar from the flowers of tall larkspur.

A female broadtailed hummingbird collects nectar from the flowers of tall larkspur.

Credit: David Inouye


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Photo of flowers of Indian paintbrush.

Indian paintbrush is one of several wildflowers adapted for hummingbird pollination.

Credit: David Inouye


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Photo of Aspen sunflowers in a montane meadow with mountains in the background.

Aspen sunflower blooms in mid-summer; it's extremely sensitive to changes in climate.

Credit: David Inouye


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Photo of flowers of rock jasmine.

Rock jasmine flowers longest in mid-summer rains. In no-rain summers, it dries up and dies.

Credit: David Inouye


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