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Press Release 11-218
Nano Materials by Design: No Small Breakthrough

Design rules will enable scientists to build desired nanomaterials for broad application of nanotechnology to address social challenges, bolstering industry and creating jobs

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Five different lattices formed from gold nanoparticles assembled using DNA linkers.

Gold nanoparticles have been assembled with DNA linkers into crystalline lattices, where particle sizes, crystal symmetries and lattice parameters can be independently controlled. This has been achieved through the development of 6 design rules that allow one to predict the relative stability of a particular structure for a given set of design parameters, such as nanoparticle size or DNA length. These rules enable the construction of both nanoscale analogues of atomic lattices, and lattices that have no naturally occuring mineral equivalent. The lattices shown here are isostructural with (from left) Cr3Si, AlB2, CsCl, NaCl and Cs6C60.

Credit: Northwestern University


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In an interview on October 10, 2011, Northwestern University Professor Chad Mirkin was asked, "What have you discovered and why is it important?" This discovery by Mirkin and his team is described in the October 14, 2011 issue of the journal Science.

Credit: Northwestern University/National Science Foundation

 

In an interview on October 10, 2011, Northwestern University Professor Chad Mirkin was asked, "What will be possible now that design rules will enable an expanded applicability of nanomaterials?" Mirkin also directs Northwestern's International Institute for Nanotechnology.

Credit: Northwestern University/National Science Foundation

 

In an interview on October 10, 2011, Northwestern University Professor Chad Mirkin was asked, "How does your work with nanotechnology and this important development fit within America's strategic goals and priorities?" Mirkin also sits on the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST).

Credit: Northwestern University/National Science Foundation

 

In an interview on October 10, 2011, Northwestern University Professor Chad Mirkin was asked, "What's next for nanotechnology? What does the future hold for nanotechnology in general and your efforts and contributions in particular?" Mirkin also sits on the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST).

Credit: Northwestern University/National Science Foundation

 

In an interview on October 10, 2011, Northwestern University Professor Chad Mirkin was asked, "What does this development say about America's investment in science now and in the future?" Mirkin serves as director of Northwestern's International Institute for Nanotechnology and is a member of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST).

Credit: Northwestern University/National Science Foundation

 

Cover of the October 14, 2011 issue of the journal Science.

The researchers' work is described in the October 14, 2011 issue of the journal Science.

Credit: Copyright AAAS 2011


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