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Press Release 11-220
U.S. Rivers and Streams Saturated With Carbon

Significant amount of carbon in land is leaking into streams and rivers, then to the atmosphere

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Satellite view of the Mississippi River showing a mosaic of riverbank land-use patterns.

A satellite view of the Mississippi River shows a mosaic of riverbank land-use patterns.

Credit: NASA


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Photo of a weir placed at NSF's Harvard Forest Long-Term Ecological Research site.

In the study, a weir was placed at NSF's Harvard Forest Long-Term Ecological Research site.

Credit: William Sobzak, College of the Holy Cross


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Photo of harmless titanium dioxide tracer which is added to streams and rivers to track carbon flow.

Scientists added a harmless titanium dioxide tracer to streams and rivers to track carbon flow.

Credit: Diana Karwan, Stroud Water Research Center


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Image showing a tangled web of stream lines derived from a data set on water flow.

Stream lines form a tangled web in this image derived from a set of data on water flow.

Credit: David Butman, Yale University


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Photo of one of the NSF Harvard Forest LTER sites.

A stream runs through it: one of the NSF Harvard Forest LTER site's many waterways.

Credit: David Butman, Yale University


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Photo of the Connecticut River in the early spring.

Early spring on the Connecticut River: scientists followed the flow of carbon along its reaches.

Credit: David Butman, Yale University


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