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Press Release 11-226

Manufacturing Goes Viral

Researchers coax viruses to assemble into synthetics with microstructures and properties akin to those of corneas, teeth and skin

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Illustration showing how the arrangement of molecular building blocks yields novel materials.

This illustration reveals how the arrangement of molecular building blocks results in materials with unique properties, both in nature and in the laboratory.

Credit: Zina Deretsky, National Science Foundation


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In this NSF webcast, University of California at Berkeley bioengineer Seung-Wuk Lee describes how his team developed a new way to rapidly and efficiently manufacture novel nanomaterials using viruses as the building blocks.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

Image showing a new process using viruses to assemble collagen-like materials.

View a video showing a new process using viruses to assemble collagen-like materials.

Credit: Video by Woo-Jae Chung, UC Berkeley

 

Image of a hand holding a glass slide with virus-based materials revealing different textures.

Tiny patches of the new virus-based materials reveal different textures and different properties for reflecting light.

Credit: University of California at Berkeley


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Image of Seung-Wuk Lee and Woojae Chung, both of the University of California at Berkeley.

Seung-Wuk Lee and Woojae Chung, both of the University of California at Berkeley, use an atomic force microscope to analyze the ramen-noddle-like nanostructure fabricated through a self-templated materials assembly process of viral particles.

Credit: University of California at Berkeley


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