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Press Release 11-230

Geoscientists Find Key to Why Some Patients Get Infections from Cardiac Implants

Bacterial cells have gene mutations that allow them to 'stick' to the devices

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Illustration showing stages of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on prosthetic heart valves.

Stages of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on prosthetic heart valves.

Credit: Steven Lower et al., PNAS


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Image of human fibronectin in background bound to a protein from Staphylococcus.

Simulation of human fibronectin (background) bound to a protein from Staphylococcus.

Credit: Roberto Lins and Steven Lower


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Image showing human fibronectin, orange, bound to fibronectin-binding protein A, green, from Staph.

Human fibronectin (orange) bound to fibronectin-binding protein A (green) from Staph.

Credit: Roberto Lins and Steven Lower


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Scanning electron micrograph of bacteria, red, in initial stages of biofilm formation.

Scanning electron micrograph of bacteria (red) in initial stages of biofilm formation.

Credit: Graeme Bowles and Steven Lower


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Electron micrograph of bacteria biofilm.

Electron micrograph of bacteria biofilm.

Credit: Graeme Bowles and Steven Lower


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Electron micrograph showing bacterial biofilm.

Bacterial biofilm, captured in an electron micrograph.

Credit: Graeme Bowles and Steven Lower


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