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Media Advisory 12-015
Cubesats "Land" at National Science Foundation on Thursday, May 24th

Scientists, engineers, educators from cubesat projects will showcase their projects at NSF headquarters in Arlington, Virginia

Back to article | Note about images

Ultra-small satellites, cubesats, used for space weather and atmospheric research.

NSF-funded cubesats: ultra-small satellites for space weather and atmospheric research.

Credit: CalPoly and Stanford Universities


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Imagine a satellite the size of a half-gallon milk carton. Low-cost satellites just that small have been making history in successes many herald as a "space revolution."

Called cubesats for the roughly four-inch-cubed dimensions of their basic building elements, each one is stacked with modern, smart-phone-like electronics and tiny scientific instruments.

On Thursday, May 24, 2012, NSF hosted an event featuring cubesats. Scientists, engineers and educators showcased their NSF-funded cubesat projects. Scheduled speakers included: Michael Morgan, NSF Division Director for Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences; Roland Coelho, California Polytechnic; James Cutler, University of Michigan; Norman Fitz-Coy, University of Florida; Eloisa de Castro, Princeton Satellite Systems, Inc.

Come join us in space ... aboard a cubesat.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

A rocket launch.

Launch of a rocket on October 28, 2011, that carried the NSF RAX and DICE cubesats.

Credit: Courtesy of spaceflightnow.com


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Illustration of a cubesat mission that studied lightning and gamma rays in thunderstorms.

The 'firefly' cubesat mission studied lightning and gamma rays in thunderstorms.

Credit: NASA


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Two completed cubesats.

Two completed cubesats at Utah State University in the DICE cubesat project.

Credit: Utah State University


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The RAX cubesat project.

Researchers at the University of Michigan work on the RAX cubesat project.

Credit: University of Michigan


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The scientific team assemblying the RAX cubesat.

The scientific team during final assembly of the RAX cubesat.

Credit: University of Michigan


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