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Press Release 12-163
Study Ties Forest "Greenness" in Western U.S. to Snowpack Extent

Mid-elevation mountain ecosystems most sensitive to rising temperatures and changes in snowmelt

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Photo of a Sierra Nevada forest in Sequoia National Park.

A Sierra Nevada forest in Sequoia National Park: snow depth and forest pattern are related.

Credit: University of Colorado, Boulder


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Photo of a researcher walking through the snow-covered forest in Sequoia National Park.

Taking snow depth measurements in Sequoia National Park requires snowshoes.

Credit: University of Colorado, Boulder


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Photo of a forest floor with patches of snow.

Forests influence snow distribution. Snowmelt in turn affects forest productivity.

Credit: University of Colorado, Boulder


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Photo of a researcher standing next to a snow depth sensor in Yosemite National Park.

A snow depth sensor in Yosemite National Park provides information about the snowpack.

Credit: University of Colorado, Boulder


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Photo of scientist Noah Molotch sampling snow density in a snow pit.

Scientist Noah Molotch samples snow density in a snow pit used to estimate water content.

Credit: University of Colorado, Boulder


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Photo of Noah Molotch, Danielle Perot and Ty Atkins studying snow properties from inside a snow pit.

Noah Molotch, Danielle Perot and Ty Atkins study snow properties from inside a snow pit.

Credit: University of Colorado, Boulder


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