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Press Release 13-069

Where Does Charcoal, or Black Carbon, in Soils Go?

Scientists find surprising new answers in wetlands such as the Everglades

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Charred boreal forest after a fire

Charred boreal forest after a fire has raged: where does the "charcoal" go?

Credit: Stefan Doerr, Swansea University


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burning charcoal

The familiar look of charcoal; some charcoal is generated by wildfires and burning fossil fuels.

Credit: Wikimedia Commons


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Alaska forest fire near NSF's Bonanza Creek LTER site

Alaska forest fire near NSF's Bonanza Creek LTER site; fires leave charcoal, or black carbon.

Credit: Stefan Doerr, Swansea University


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Florida Coastal Everglades LTER site

At NSF's Florida Coastal Everglades LTER site, charcoal is part of the dissolved organic carbon.

Credit: Wikimedia Commons


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Everglades wetlands as seen under water

Charcoal, or black carbon, makes its way through Everglades wetlands and to the sea.

Credit: NSF Florida Coastal Everglades LTER Site


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cover of Science magazine

The researchers' findings are described in the April 19 issue of the journal Science.

Credit: Copyright AAAS 2013


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