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Press Release 13-076

What Happened to Dinosaurs' Predecessors After Earth's Largest Extinction 252 Million Years Ago?

Fossil-hunting expeditions to Tanzania, Zambia and Antarctica provide new insights

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Graphic illustration showing an artist depiction os Asilisaurus

After the ancient extinction, some animals, like Asilisaurus, had more restricted ranges.

Credit: Marlene Donnelly/Field Museum of Natural History


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Graphic illustration showing an artist depiction of Dicynodon

The extinction took out species like Dicynodon; other herbivores then moved in.

Credit: Marlene Donnelly/Field Museum of Natural History


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Global map showing South Africa, Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania, Antarctica

Fossils from South Africa, Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania, Antarctica were part of the research.

Credit: U of Texas at Austin/UW


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Paleontologist Christian Sidor excavates a fossil in Tanzania.

Paleontologist Christian Sidor excavates a fossil in Tanzania.

Credit: Linda Tsuji


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Scientists Ken Angielczyk, Roger Smith and Sebastien Steyer cast a skull of a dicynodont.

Scientists Ken Angielczyk, Roger Smith and Sebastien Steyer cast a skull of a dicynodont.

Credit: Christian Sidor/UW


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Fossilized remains on display on a table

Fossilized remains being sorted of a new specimen of Asilisaurus collected in Tanzania.

Credit: Roger H. M. Smith


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