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Press Release 13-198
Related coral species differ in how they survive climate change effects

Genetic data reveal a tale of two corals

Back to article | Note about images

Two Porites corals of two different species, growing side-by-side

Two species of Porites corals growing side-by-side; the one at left is bleached.

Credit: Iliana Baums, PSU


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Researchers with exuipment under water sample lobe corals of the species Porites lobata.

Researchers sample lobe corals of the species Porites lobata.

Credit: Joshua Feingold, Nova Southeastern University


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Porites coral with keyhole-shaped openings

Keyhole-shaped openings in this Porites coral are made by tiny mussels living inside.

Credit: Iliana Baums, PSU


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Small mussels inside the coral colony have pockmocked its surface with openings.

Small mussels inside the coral colony have pockmocked its surface with openings.

Credit: Iliana Baums, PSU


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A hand holding mussels living inside the coral skeleton and a measuring tape

Side view of mussels living inside the coral skeleton. The green/brown is living coral.

Credit: Iliana Baums, PSU


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Adult lobe corals

Triggerfish bite adult lobe corals to get at mussels; coral fragments grow into new colonies.

Credit: Iliana Baums, PSU


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