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National Science Foundation
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Storm-Chasing, Winter-Style

SCHUSS. The term for a straight, downhill ski run. In the land of the "Greatest Snow on Earth" – Utah – SCHUSS is also the moniker for storm-chasing, Old Man Winter-style.



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A Conifer's View of Snow

If trees could talk, what winter tales they might tell: of the frozen soil in which they're rooted, the snows that fall on their branches, the icy rivers and streams that flow beneath, and the health of the entire forest.



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Nature's Igloo

The subnivium, it's called, this refuge beneath the snow that's insulated and maintains a constant temperature. It's nature's igloo for all winter creatures great and small.

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Where Have Our Winters Gone?

If you're planning to skate on a frozen lake or river this winter, ski on a snowy slope, or, when spring arrives, depend on snowmelt to refill your water supply, you may need to think twice. December-to-March may be less like the winters we remember.




Video: Catch a Falling Snowflake

Stop-action: view the inner world of a snowflake as it's falling, via the lens of a new high-speed camera.

Video: Snow, Ice and Water:
A Zero Sum Game

Niwot Ridge, Colorado. It's 11,600 feet above sea level, and is home to a National Science Foundation Long-Term Ecological Research site. There scientists study snow – and what happens to our water resources when it begins to melt.

 




 
Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations presented in this material are only those of the presenter grantee/researcher, author, or agency employee; and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.