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AAAS Fellow Biography

Justin Lawrence

Dr. Elizabeth Boatman
AAAS Fellow
Directorate for Education and Human Resources
Office of the Assistant Director
Class of 2014

Dr. Elizabeth Boatman received her B.S. from Beloit College in Physics and Applied Chemistry in 2007. As an undergraduate, she participated in multiple research internships, studying the exciton diffusion length in organic solar cells at Stanford University in California (2005) and the fractionation of stable selenium isotopes recovered from black shale toward dating prehistoric events of rising atmospheric oxygen levels at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts (2007). Elizabeth was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa in 2006, as a junior. Her undergraduate curriculum inspired her interest in materials and technology: after Beloit College, Elizabeth matriculated to the University of California, Berkeley, where she earned M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Materials Science and Engineering.

Ever-fascinated with the biological world and its interface (both conceptually and physically) with materials technology, she pursued a unique collaboration with the University of California Museum of Paleontology during her graduate research studies. For her dissertation work, and as an active collaborator with paleontology researchers from institutions across the United States, Elizabeth studied the nanoscale chemical and structural changes that occur in fossil bone, in addition to chemical changes that preserve blood vessel tissues as a result of diagenesis. Heavy on materials characterization and paleontological fundamentals, the ultimate goal of each project was to extract critical parameters that could be used to better inform materials engineered based on biological systems (i.e., composite ceramics, polymers). Currently, Elizabeth is a AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow, placed at the National Science Foundation in a cross-disciplinary role between the Directorate for Education and Human Resources and the Office of Legislative and Public Affairs.

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