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Press Release 13-143
Keeping pace with plant pathogens

Plant immune system research ready for application, say researchers

Back to article | Note about images

Potato plants

Late blight can wreak havoc on red-skinned Desiree potato plants, like the ones on the right side of this photo, taken of a field trial in the United Kingdom in August 2012. The healthy plants on the left have been bred with disease-resistance genes from other plants, and are late-blight resistant.

Credit: Kamil Witek and Jonathan Jones, Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, UK

 

Tomato plants

The upper image shows tomato plants with bacterial leaf spot disease in a Florida field trial, from June 2012. Below are tomato plants bred with a pepper disease-resistance gene. Those plants exhibit far less bacterial spot symptoms, plus have an increased fruit yield.

Credit: Diana Horvath, Two Blades Foundation

 

cover of Science magazine

The researchers' work is described in the Aug. 16, 2013, issue of the journal Science.

Credit: Copyright AAAS 2013


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