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Press Release 07-132

Geologists Recover Rocks From San Andreas Fault

Scientists drill into earthquake zone 10,000-plus feet beneath Earth's surface

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For the first time, geologists have drilled into the San Andreas Fault.

For the first time, geologists have drilled into the San Andreas Fault.

Credit: Zina Deretsky, National Science Foundation


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This drilling rig was used to retrieve samples of rock from the San Andreas Fault.

This drilling rig was used to retrieve samples of rock from the San Andreas Fault.

Credit: EarthScope


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The green rock on the right, called serpentinite, is a strand of the San Andreas fault.

The green rock on the right, called serpentinite, is a strand of the San Andreas fault.

Credit: EarthScope


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Photo of Kaye Shedlock

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Kaye Shedlock, NSF EarthScope program director, comments on EarthScope and the SAFOD project.

Credit: National Science Foundation/Stanford

 

Photo of Steve Hickman

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Steve Hickman, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), describes the core sample retrieved from the San Andreas Fault.

Credit: National Science Foundation/Stanford

 

Photo of Zoback

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Mark Zoback of Stanford University describes the current phase of drilling through the San Andreas Fault.

Credit: National Science Foundation/Stanford