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NSF News 09-233

National Science Foundation and NBC Learn Help Students Discover "The Science of the Olympic Winter Games"

Online videos explain the science behind winning gold at the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games

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Text: Science of the Olympic Winter Games, NBC Learn; images: skater and NSF, NBC, Olympics logos.

The Science of the Olympic Winter Games, a new, fast-moving, 16-part, video series for students and adults capitalizes on next February's Vancouver Olympics to focus on the science behind how athletes skate, ski, jump and curl their way to winter Olympic gold.

Credit: NBC Learn & NSF


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More than just a physical game, hockey is a showcase for physics on ice. Olympic athlete Julie Chu demonstrates the physics of the slapshot.

Credit: NBC Learn & NSF

 

a bobsled enveloped with arrows from the front to the rear showing drag.

In episode 11, "Banking on Speed," Paul Doherty, senior scientist at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, Deborah King, Associate professor in the department of exercise and sports sciences at Ithaca College, physicist George Tuthill of Plymouth State University, and bobsled designer Bob Cuneo, the team explain how drag impacts the chances for the United States' four-man bobsled team to win its first gold medal in more than 60 years.

Credit: NBC Learn & NSF


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Photo of Olympic hopeful Rachael Flatt spinning on her skates.

Olympic hopeful Rachael Flatt and Deborah King, an Associate professor in the department of exercise and sports sciences at Ithaca College, explain how skaters increase rotation in the air with their triple axels and quadruple toe loops. Here, Rachel Flatt spins on her skates.

Credit: NBC Learn & NSF


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boots on skis.

U.S. Ski Team members Julia Mancuso, Ted Ligety and Scott Macartney, and Katharine Flores, an Associate professor in the department of materials science and engineering at Ohio State University, explain how the materials used to make skis play a vital role in their performance on the mountain.

Credit: NBC Learn & NSF


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