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Division of Computer and Network Systems


Cyber-Physical Systems  (CPS)


CONTACTS
Name Email Phone Room
David  Corman dcorman@nsf.gov (703) 292-8754   
Radhakisan  Baheti rbaheti@nsf.gov (703) 292-8339   
Anindya  Banerjee abanerje@nsf.gov (703) 292-7885   
Sankar  Basu sabasu@nsf.gov (703) 292-7843   
Jordan  Berg jberg@nsf.gov (703) 292-5365   
Cynthia  Chen qchen@nsf.gov (703) 292-2563   
John  C. Cherniavsky jchernia@nsf.gov (703) 292-5136   
Sara  Kiesler skiesler@nsf.gov (703) 292-8643   
Bruce  Kramer bkramer@nsf.gov (703) 292-5348   
Anthony  Kuh akuh@nsf.gov (703) 292-2210   
Robert  Landers rlanders@nsf.gov (703) 292-2652   
Wendy  Nilsen wnilsen@nsf.gov (703) 292-2568   
Anil  Pahwa apahwa@nsf.gov (703) 292-2285   
Phillip  A. Regalia pregalia@nsf.gov (703) 292-2981   
Sylvia  Spengler sspengle@nsf.gov (703) 292-8930   
Jonathan  Sprinkle jsprinkl@nsf.gov (703) 292-8719   
Ralph  Wachter rwachter@nsf.gov (703) 292-8950   


PROGRAM GUIDELINES

Solicitation  19-553

Important Information for Proposers

A revised version of the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) (NSF 19-1), is effective for proposals submitted, or due, on or after February 25, 2019. Please be advised that, depending on the specified due date, the guidelines contained in NSF 19-1 may apply to proposals submitted in response to this funding opportunity.


DUE DATES

Full Proposal Window

    September 12, 2019 - September 26, 2019

        Frontier


SYNOPSIS

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are engineered systems that are built from, and depend upon, the seamless integration of computation and physical components. Advances in CPS will enable capability, adaptability, scalability, resiliency, safety, security, and usability that will expand the horizons of these critical systems. CPS technologies are transforming the way people interact with engineered systems, just as the Internet has transformed the way people interact with information. New, smart CPS drive innovation and competition in a range of application domains including agriculture, aeronautics, building design, civil infrastructure, energy, environmental quality, healthcare and personalized medicine, manufacturing, and transportation. Moreover, the integration of artificial intelligence with CPS creates new research opportunities with major societal implications.

While tremendous progress has been made in advancing CPS technologies, the demand for innovation across application domains is driving the need to accelerate fundamental research to keep pace. At the same time, the CPS program seeks to open new vistas for the research community to think beyond the usual cyber-physical paradigms and structures and propose creative ideas to address the myriad challenges of today's systems as well as those of the future that have not yet been designed or fielded.

The CPS program aims to develop the core research needed to engineer these complex CPS, some of which may also require dependable, high-confidence, or provable behaviors. Core research areas of the program include control, data analytics, autonomy, design, information management, internet of things (IoT), mixed initiatives including human-in- or on-the-loop, networking, privacy, real-time systems, safety, security, and verification. By abstracting from the particulars of specific systems and application domains, the CPS program seeks to reveal cross-cutting, fundamental scientific and engineering principles that underpin the integration of cyber and physical elements across all application domains. The program additionally supports the development of methods, tools, and hardware and software components based upon these cross-cutting principles, along with validation of the principles via prototypes and testbeds. This program also fosters a research community that is committed to advancing education and outreach in CPS and accelerating the transition of CPS research into the real world.

 All proposals must include the following as part of the Project Description:

  • Research Description that describes the technical rationale and technical approach of the CPS research, including the challenges that drive the research problem and how the research integrates cyber and physical components. This section must also describe how the research outcomes are translational to other application domains. Specifically, it must include:
    • A subsection titled "Intellectual Merit"
    • A subsection called "CPS Research Focus" that identifies and describes the specific core CPS research areas being addressed in which novel and foundational research contributions are being made.
  • An Evaluation/Experimentation Plan that describes how proposed concepts will be validated and outlines the metrics for success;
  • A Project Management and Collaboration Plan that summarizes how the project team is ideally suited to realize the project goals and how the team will ensure effective collaboration; and
  • A Broader Impacts section that describes how the research will be disseminated to a broad and diverse audience. This should go beyond traditional academic publications and includes education and outreach from the research team spanning multiple levels of engagement. Broader Impacts encompasses Broadening Participation in Computing (BPC) and Engineering (BPE).

In FY 2019, NSF is working closely with multiple agencies across the federal government, including the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T); the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA); several National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and centers including the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Cancer Institute (NCI), and National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS); and the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA, hereafter referred to as NIFA). In addition, NSF is working closely with the German Research Foundation (DFG) to support joint U.S./German research projects in the Networked CPS area.  

Proposals for three classes of research and education projects—differing in scope and goals—will be considered through this solicitation:

  • Small projects may request a total budget of up to $500,000 for a period of up to 3 years. They are well suited to emerging new and innovative ideas that may have high impact on the field of CPS.
  • Medium projects may request a total budget ranging from $500,001 to $1,200,000 for a period of up to 3 years. They are well suited to multi-disciplinary projects that accomplish clear goals requiring integrated perspectives spanning the disciplines.
  • Frontier projects must address clearly identified critical CPS challenges that cannot be achieved by a set of smaller projects. Furthermore, Frontier projects should also look to push the boundaries of CPS well beyond today's systems and capabilities. Funding may be requested for a total of $1,200,001 to $7,000,000 for a period of 4 to 5 years. Note that the Frontier project submission window is different than that for Small and Medium projects.


RELATED URLS


What Has Been Funded (Recent Awards Made Through This Program, with Abstracts)

Map of Recent Awards Made Through This Program

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