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Press Release 13-087
National Science Foundation-Funded Researchers Present Commercial-Ready Technologies to Industry

Researchers gather in Baltimore to introduce technologies that rapidly detect infectious diseases, separate oil from sand after environmental disasters and auction media advertising

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AIR technology translation program encourages NSF grantees to commercialize research discoveries.

AIR technology translation program encourages NSF-funded technology investigators to consider commercializing promising research discoveries.

Credit: Thinkstock

 

Paul Painter, president and co-founder of IL Fuels LLC and a professor of polymer science and engineering in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at Penn State University discusses his AIR project that uses ionic liquids to separate oil from sand after environmental disasters.

Credit: NSF

 

Associate professor and director of the Adaptive Integrated Microsystems Laboratory at Michigan State University, Shantanu Chakrabartty discusses his AIR project, a self-powered wireless sensor called a piezo-floating-gate that stores structural strain data when embedded in buildings.

Credit: NSF

 

David Freedman's commercial-ready AIR technology project provides rapid detection and surveillance of infectious agents, which is an unsolved challenge in the medical and biodefense communities.

Credit: NSF

 

Carnegie Mellon University computer science professor Tuomas Sandholm gives insight into his newly developed optimized auction system for buying and selling media advertising time. The system solves a previously unsolvable problem regarding selling and scheduling ads.

Credit: NSF

 

AIR Technology Translation program encourages NSF-funded technology investigators to consider commercializing promising research discoveries.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 



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